Posted in Software

Adobe’s plugin for Photoshop CS4 to disable canvas rotation via the trackpad

I’m linking to this because I’ve been stung by the problem too. The issue is with new MacBooks and MacBook Pros with the button-less trackpad. These trackpads have no dead zone like the old trackpads did. So until I get accustomed to using them, I often end up resting my right thumb on the lower portion of the trackpad where the physical button used to be. Because of this, once I go to move the cursor with the trackpad, I inadvertently perform a two-finger gesture, which Apple now recognizes on these new trackpads. Photoshop interprets these as either zoom or rotate actions, which is rarely what I want to happen. This plugin disables those actions in Photoshop, until Adobe engineers figure a graceful way to interpret (or otherwise ignore) two-finger gestures.

On the Flickr support in iPhoto ’09

Fraser Speirs, developer behind FlickrExport (iPhoto plugin software that I use) dives into the details and simplified — or crippled, depending on your view — functionality of Flickr integration in Apple’s iPhoto ’09. I may have discovered this on my own after using it, but it’s nice to see some of the differences I should note before I try iPhoto’s Flickr syncing. Sure, Fraser has a biased view. But FlickrExport seems to be a way better option for exporting photos to Flickr from iPhoto or Aperature. That is, at least, if you want more control over how, and to whom, photos appear on Flickr. (via Daring Fireball)

xScope 2

Simply put, xScope is a back-pocket, time-saving utility for designers and developers created by designers who understand the nature of working on screen. I haven’t written much about the software I use. But once in a while I come across something that’s so useful, I’m compelled to spread the word a little further. And the latest update of xScope to v2.0 adds some really nice enhancements worth drawing me out of hibernation. continued

Mac app: High Priority

Every once in a while, an application/utility comes along that hits a sweet spot. Something for which I’ve been looking, but haven’t been able to find. I’m a list-maker. Especially to-do lists. For more than a year, I’ve been wanting a simple to-do list manager that I can call up from the Mac OS X menu bar. Something simple, light-weight, nicely designed, and above all else, reads and writes to pre-existing data in iCal. continued

Photon open sourced

The inner-workings for a clever little plugin named Photon that enables photo export from iPhoto directly to Movable Type and other publishing tools (to create photo galleries like this) are now available for anyone to explore and build upon. Jonathan Younger, who originally created the plugin, doesn’t have enough time to dedicate for updating and expanding the plugin. So he generously released Photon’s source code under the GNU Lesser General Public License so that others could continue evolving it.

So if you lament that you can’t use Photon because you’re not on a Mac, or you don’t use iPhoto, or for whatever reason, and you’re good with application/plugin development, here’s your chance to grab Photon’s source code, morph it, add to it, expand its function or supported formats, or whatever you want to contribute.

Underline text in Adobe Illustrator

Last week, when I announced the Blogger redesign, I mentioned that I’ve been using Adobe Illustrator much more often to comp my designs, instead of Photoshop. The vector-based Illustrator provides more flexibility in shape rendering, and allows me to create and tweak designs faster than the bitmap editing of Photoshop. Once we’ve honed in on a final design, then I move over to Photoshop for a final polish and pixel-level precision for the site’s images. continued

Drag-scrolling in Safari

[The Saft icon, a flat-screen iMac showing the Safari logo on its screen] Saft is a Safari plugin that allows true full-screen browsing, kiosk mode, and type-ahead searching familiar to the Mozilla family. I gave Saft a whirl after reading a glowing review from Jon Hicks about a month ago. I’m quickly realizing the full-screen mode of Saft is handy when giving HTML/CSS-based presentations. I’ve been using Firefox and a fullscreen bookmarklet for my presentations, but some of the browser chrome and the menu bar still show when using that method. With Saft’s full-screen mode, the only piece of the browser still visible is the scroll bar, and that’s only if it’s needed. continued

Version troubles

Todd Dominey beats me to the punch, and says everything (and more) about software version naming schemes I was thinking of writing. Inspired by Adobe’s drop of the numerical versions in favor of a letter-based system (“CS”) for their new Creative Suite, the move seems to be a short-sighted marketing ploy in attempt to follow a trend set by Apple, Microsoft, and Macromedia. continued

Host

Stopdesign is hosted on a Virtual Private Server at Dreamhost.