Posted in Css

Filtering CSS

To the point: This entry introduces a new CSS filter that can be used to import a separate style sheet for IE5/Mac, named the IE5/Mac Band Pass Filter.

Back Story

Ideally, I try to avoid the use of hacks in CSS files, if at all possible. Sadly, the continued discrepancies in the way browsers interpret CSS specifications (and then implement them) still require the use of more hacks than I’d like to see in my style sheets. I would prefer not to use any hacks or filters, but sometimes, they’re a necessary evil. Fortunately, hacks, workarounds, and filters can be used with discretion to ensure as much cross-browser design consistency as possible. continued

The new mp3.com

This must be the week — if not the day — to launch new designs of products and services under new ownership. Good friend, and former colleague at Wired, Stephen Blake played a large role in today’s launch of the new CNET-owned mp3.com redesign. XHTML, CSS, Sliding Doors, and rounded corners… oh my. continued

The return

Ah, that feels comfortable. Like a whirlwind travel adventure to a new place you’ve seen in lots of pictures, but never experienced for yourself, then returning home and being able to slip back into your own comfortable clothes, and collapse in your own bed. There’s a familiarity here with the markup, style, and templates that feels good. continued

DWM interview

There’s a spattering of activity here all of a sudden. Yes, I’ve been busy. And yes, you’ll see even more from me soon. Big things have been in the works for a long time.

Digital Web Magazine just posted another interview for their latest issue, this time, the questions from Craig Saila were directed at me. Read all about why I wrote off CSS as a failed pipedream for so long, what I think about the Wired News design more than a year after our launch, and my sentiments about the end of Webmonkey.

SxSW CSS presentations

I’ve received a few requests for public links to the presentations I used for the CSS panels at SxSW. In the spirit of sharing information–and since they’ve already been linked from other locations–I’ll point to them here. If you weren’t there, you won’t get all the commentary that went along with them, but you’ll get an idea of what I covered for each panel. If you were there, thanks for coming; I hope we covered topics on both panels that were engaging and relevant to you. continued

The Macromedia interview

Last August, I praised Macromedia for its release of Dreamweaver MX 2004 with its broad advances in support for CSS and accessibility. When I want to use a visual editor to crank out a quick HTML comp, sometimes I’ll use Dreamweaver. But for those of you who know me and my working style, you may know I usually prefer to hand-code over using visual editors. That’s just me, and my insane desire to type one character at a time. While I didn’t spend as much time in Dreamweaver during the Wired News redesign, you can bet that its powerful text-editing companion HomeSite saw hours and hours of use once I had a design finalized. (Since it only exists for Windows, HomeSite is the one and only thing I miss now that I’ve switched back to Mac.)

continued

Doug talks

Earlier today, I had the honor of giving a presentation about the beauty of CSS at Digital Design World. The crowd seemed warmly receptive to hearing about (and seeing) how they can make better-looking sites by putting into practice some basic design principles, practical tips, and a few advanced techniques.

Tomorrow afternoon, I co-present a session on “Design and Accessibility” with Andrew Kirkpatrick, Project Manager from the WGBH National Center for Accessible Media. I’m looking forward to sharing the stage with Andrew, and discussing how paying more attention to accessibility does not mean resorting to insipid design. continued

Let's be bad

Ooo, yeah, I know. Jeffrey Zeldman reports that the CSS Validator Changes the Rules. It chokes on the Box Model Hack’s voice-family property when used in a style sheet specified with the “screen” media type. Jeffrey plans on republishing his piece tomorrow at A List Apart, which of course, will have a forum attached, if you care to respond. continued

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